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Writing and Winning Grants!
Bright Ideas just issued their grant winner checks and Kelly Davis was able to get one of those grants for her media center.  Also this week, the JoCo Education Foundation awarded their first round of grants for the 2015-16 school year, congratulations to Natalee Whitaker for getting one of these grants for a 3D Printer in her media center.

Where to start -

You have to first believe that there is money available to get the resources you need for any project or innovative idea you would like to try. Next, you just have to know where to look.  Let's start with a list of grant options, here is a running list that I continuously add to throughout the year, keep checking back, some are local while some are state and national grants: https://delicious.com/amystanley/grants you can also check out the link posted each week in the JCS Happenings: http://www.johnston.k12.nc.us/cms/One.aspx?portalId=3023758&pageId=4104807

Tips for writing a successful grant -
  1. Make sure what you going to ask for is something you are excited and passionate about, don't just ask for tools because you think you can use them.  Dream about what you will change in your media center first, then select the items that will make the dream become a reality.
  2. Be sure you share the background data with the reviewers, so they get the whole picture of your situation and how the grant can make a difference.
  3. Follow the guidelines very carefully and be sure you submit your application by the deadline.
  4. Have a pair of outside eyes look over your submission prior to hitting send.  Often times a fresh pair of eyes might help pick up on important details that need clarification or more information (creating a draft in google is a great way to flesh out your ideas then just copy and paste to the real thing when it is time).
  5. Make a connection!  Dave in our office has won many grants and he shared his secret - paint a picture of the interaction your students will have with the items you want, you want the grant reviewer's reaction to be: "I want my own kid to have that experience"  
  6. Keep in the forefront of your submission: "What will students do?" Most successful grants focus on our kids!
Good luck!  Let us know if we can help you in anyway.



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Monday, November 16, 2015

Media Monday Tip: Grant Ideas


Writing and Winning Grants!
Bright Ideas just issued their grant winner checks and Kelly Davis was able to get one of those grants for her media center.  Also this week, the JoCo Education Foundation awarded their first round of grants for the 2015-16 school year, congratulations to Natalee Whitaker for getting one of these grants for a 3D Printer in her media center.

Where to start -

You have to first believe that there is money available to get the resources you need for any project or innovative idea you would like to try. Next, you just have to know where to look.  Let's start with a list of grant options, here is a running list that I continuously add to throughout the year, keep checking back, some are local while some are state and national grants: https://delicious.com/amystanley/grants you can also check out the link posted each week in the JCS Happenings: http://www.johnston.k12.nc.us/cms/One.aspx?portalId=3023758&pageId=4104807

Tips for writing a successful grant -
  1. Make sure what you going to ask for is something you are excited and passionate about, don't just ask for tools because you think you can use them.  Dream about what you will change in your media center first, then select the items that will make the dream become a reality.
  2. Be sure you share the background data with the reviewers, so they get the whole picture of your situation and how the grant can make a difference.
  3. Follow the guidelines very carefully and be sure you submit your application by the deadline.
  4. Have a pair of outside eyes look over your submission prior to hitting send.  Often times a fresh pair of eyes might help pick up on important details that need clarification or more information (creating a draft in google is a great way to flesh out your ideas then just copy and paste to the real thing when it is time).
  5. Make a connection!  Dave in our office has won many grants and he shared his secret - paint a picture of the interaction your students will have with the items you want, you want the grant reviewer's reaction to be: "I want my own kid to have that experience"  
  6. Keep in the forefront of your submission: "What will students do?" Most successful grants focus on our kids!
Good luck!  Let us know if we can help you in anyway.



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